Posts Tagged: teen writing

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She opens her eyes to see
The morning sun draw patterns
On her child’s quiet face,
Her love in the shadow that brings peace

She whisks away the anxiety
Of her nervous husband who
Is about to crack a multimillion dollar deal,
Her love in the soothing touch of confidence

She consoles the heart
Of her devastated sister
Who just broke up with her boyfriend,
Her love in the strong comforting hug

She breathes the happiness
Of her blind mother
Ecstatic at knowing about her grandkids’ pranks,
Her love in the stories she tells

She feels the responsibility
Towards her father
Unsure of his abilities,
Her love in the arm of support on his shoulder

At the end of the day
As she takes time to herself
The time she spent
With her loved ones flashes through her mind

She senses the smile
The happiness
The serenity of those close to her
That brings forth the warmth and joy on her own tired face

She now knows that
She is a woman
Her day never ends
And her life is but a web of love

A web, woven intricately
Around the lives
Of those who do and don’t belong to her
Because a woman does not choose, she simply delivers.

Isha Sikdar

Read more poetry, articles, and take part in the discussion at http://kidspiritonline.com.

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"I grew up in the Hindu tradition, and as I explored one of the most notable of Vedic literatures, the Bhagavatam, I saw a trend. Women lived in the shadow of men. They were chaste, faithful to their husbands, and docile…As a loyal egalitarian, Vedic ideas of gender roles shake my faith quite a bit. I’ve wondered, would I want to live in an ideal Vedic society if I were a woman? At first, I let these questions broil in the darkness. They were always there, but I ignored them, content in my state of spiritual stagnation. As I address these fears, however, I’ve started to understand my religion’s stance on gender roles better, and from that I’ve begun to accept the Vedic system for what it is.”

Read the rest of the article here: http://kidspiritonline.com/2013/08/evolving-gender-roles-in-the-vedas/

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Torn;
Pieces of her heart scattered by the gnawing teeth of death.
Dreamless;
Emptiness clawing at her soul, clambering for freedom.

Tear-stained cheeks,
Scorched by invisible hands.
Vacant eyes, void of life,
Staring past into darkness.

Splattered crimson;
Splotches of scarlet.
Painless torture;
Anguish within.

Death;
Liberation from this infernal abyss.
Taunting, jeering,
Too weak to attain.

Burning sensation;
Marked arms.
Cold steel;
Hopeless comfort.

Flashbacks;
“Once upon a time,”
Now, the “happy ending,”
Only living nightmares.

She prays for the end;
But her mind,
Replays his presence,
“Keep living.”

Her fatherless baby, snuggles;
Buries deeper into warmth.
Warmth,
Impossible for her, the mother.

Wide, innocent blue eyes.
Floods the memories.
Memories she wishes to remember,
And forget.

Curious, angel eyes,
Searching her mother’s soul,
Pulsing, radiating,
Light.

Her heart and being,
Now sparked by her baby,
Flames of hope,
A new beginning.

Oblivious to the world,
The baby, her mother’s precious gift,
Sleeps peacefully,
Never a hero too small.

Christina Wang

Read more poetry, articles, and take part in the discussion at http://kidspiritonline.com.

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"KidSpirit Magazine makes it both interesting and cool for young people to grapple with [life’s deep questions]." -Council for Spiritual and Ethical Education

Read poetry, articles, and take part in the discussion at http://kidspiritonline.com.

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"Masculinity in TV shows is often depicted by the perfect male character who exudes confidence around his peers, is able to take control of his life, is a charming gentleman to female characters, is an intelligent, street-smart person, and has an honest heart. Yet these characteristics are never perfectly in agreement with real-life characteristics of men. Shows like “Revolution” and “Smallville” represent this particular type of masculine stereotype. However, two notable exceptions represent a contrast to the stereotypical plotline: “Boy Meets World,” a television series that ran from 1993 to 2000, and ‘The Big Bang Theory,” a show that is currently on air on prime time TV, and began in 2007. The male characters on “Boy Meets World” and “The Big Bang Theory” represent a type of “anti-hero” that is gradually evolving into a new type of hero and a new brand of “masculinity” in the 21st century.”

Read the rest of the article here: http://kidspiritonline.com/2013/08/masculinity-on-television-the-new-evolving-hero/

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Pessimism lays its icy hands upon me,
But I can resist the intense chill.
Caged like a bird, craving to be set free,
There is an iridescent ray of hope still.

Thorns of fear prick my soul to the core,
But I am determined to surpass the obstacle.
Defeats lessen my faith all the more,
But I’ll emerge victorious and reach the pinnacle.

Why is the world evil to me? I wonder
Are ‘his’ deeds so profound? A hollow statement
What have I done? I fail to recognize my blunder.
The discrimination remains, there is no amendment

My beauty is compared with blooming flowers,
Then why do they pluck those blossoms heartlessly?
And render meaningless the divine merciful showers
And call the world a paradise fallaciously!

Nevertheless, hurdles await my benign presence
To be transformed into stepping stones in every respect
These silvery tears don’t convey my distress
Rather a humble message to the biased, to introspect.

Tanmaya Murthy

Read more poetry, articles, and take part in the discussion at http://kidspiritonline.com.

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"I love how we’re not afraid to ask the big questions." -Sofiy, 14, KidSpirit contributor

Read poetry, articles, and take part in the discussion at http://kidspiritonline.com.

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"As a 17-year-old girl living in an urban environment, gender boundaries have been less rigid for me than others…I have never felt like my gender held me back, or felt that it was a role I was forced to conform to. However, some of my friends from more traditional towns have had a different experience with gender. They were expected to be the epitome of a stereotypical female, regardless of their actual personalities and preferences. In this case, the qualities that represented gender differences were not necessarily their nature, or biological preferences, but a result of the community they had been raised in."

Read the rest of the article here: http://kidspiritonline.com/2013/08/pink-vs-blue-are-childhood-toy-preferences-innate/

Artwork by Zoe Miller. Copyright 2013, KidSpirit, Inc.

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"I want you to use your imagination for a minute. Think about the perfect teen girl. Now, of course, no one is perfect. But just hang in there with me — what image or ideal comes to your mind? A photo from a magazine? A celebrity? Someone you know from school? A friend? Or just a general sense of somebody with a certain kind of face, hair, and body? Now, think about the ideal teen boy — the perfect guy. What does he look like? Is he someone you know or more like a picture you’ve seen? The reason I am asking is that the ability to think about an ideal, like the perfect boy or girl, is very important to the adult women and men that we become. These ideals — our deepest and often unconscious sense of who we are and should be — are basic to our identity. They tell us who we are.”

Read the rest of Dr. Elizabeth Debold’s riveting PerSpectives article for our summer issue The Soul of Gender here: http://kidspiritonline.com/2013/07/who-are-you-really-boy-or-girl-or-spirit/

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"KidSpirit has provided me with a real spiritual outlet." -Susan

Read poetry, articles, and take part in the discussion at http://kidspiritonline.com.